Comment on Nonfiction

Adults don’t write book reports.

But they nevertheless still think as they read nonfiction books.

What do they think about?

What could you think about as you read a nonfiction book?

Is the publisher reliable?
Is the author credible?

What is the worldview of the author?
Do I share the same worldview or is my view different?
Is the author primarily informing me of facts or trying to convince me?
Why did the author write this book?

What pictures are being created in my mind by the words in the book?
What colours do I see? What sounds do I hear? What sensations do I feel?

What ideas do I think are important to remember?
What evidence is there for those ideas?
What background knowledge do I have that supports the evidence in this book?
What background knowledge do I have that disagrees with the evidence in this book?

What connections can I make to other books I have read?
What connections can I make to my own experiences in life?
What connections can I make to world events?

How does this book make me see life differently?
How will this book cause me to change my own behaviour?

Who will I talk to about what I’ve learned in this book?
What facts do I want to memorize so I don’t forget them?

 

 I read ___ by ____ (____ , __ ). I chose this nonfiction book because _____ . Before I even started reading, I already knew that ________ .  Reading this book, I learned a lot more: __________ . Now I wonder, ________ . This book started me thinking more about _______ .

I read A Kid’s Guide to the Brain by Sylvia Funston and Jay Ingram (Greey de Pencier Books, 1994). I chose this book because I hope to become a neurologist, brain specialist, one day and expanding my general knowledge about the brain would help me in the future. This book also had lots of illustrations and fun activities to do that made it more interesting and easier to remember facts. Before I even started reading, I already knew that there were two parts to our brain, a left brain and a right brain. I knew that the right brain was working harder when I was doing something with music, art or creativity and that my left brain was responsible for tasks that require more thinking such as reading, writing and math! Reading this book, I learned a lot more: Our brain started as what we call a “reptilian brain” which control things such as breathing and sleeping. On top of that grew the “feeling brain” that takes care of our body temperature and emotions. Lastly, on the outside we have the “thinking brain” which sets us apart from other creatures, deciding how strong a reaction should be to messages from our feeling brain. Now I wonder, if we started out with just one part in our brain, and now have three, will our brains evolve even more in the future? Or what are our dreams for? Are they highlighting important events of our day, getting rid of unnecessary ideas, or are they just stories of strange images we think about? This book started me thinking more about how we can learn to use our brain more wisely or take it to the full potential it can reach, such as controlling our dreams or hiding our strongest emotions, which I hope to be able to do. (Ilar)

 

 

 

 

 

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