Introductions and Conclusions

Tips for Writing Introductions and Conclusions

 

Look at your main idea.

e.g. Sometimes children have to be more grown up than the adults in novels for young adults.

e.g. Both outer and inner resources are essential for survival in stories set in the wilderness.

e.g. Novels of World War I portray a world of quiet humanity in the midst of desperate savagery.

Look at your three topic sentences.

e.g. The main character has to protect herself both physically and emotionally.
The main character also has to find food and shelter for herself.
Despite many hardships, the main character not only cares for herself but helps others.

e.g. Finding food and water are the first essentials in survival.
Secondly, finding shelter is key to survival.
Finally, keeping a positive and hopeful attitude is necessary in order to survive hardships.

e.g. Being a soldier during a war is terrifying.
Being a soldier requires a great deal of physical and emotional hardship.
Despite all the hardships, there are times when kindness and compassion prevail.

Now comes the tough part: writing a sentence that will create interest in a reader.

e.g. Children can be tougher than they appear.
e.g. Just like in real life, fictional survivors are tough.
e.g. Underneath all the chaos, there are moments of true valour in war.

To write your introduction, put all these sentences together.

e.g. Children can be tougher than they appear. The main character in ______ by _______ (publisher, date) has to protect herself both physically and emotionally. S/he also has to find food and shelter for herself/himself. Despite many hardships, s/he not only cares for herself/himself but helps others. Sometimes children have to be more grown up than the adults in novels for young adults.

e.g. Just like in real life, fictional survivors are tough. Finding food and water are the first essentials in survival. Secondly, finding shelter is key to survival. Finally, keeping a positive and hopeful attitude is necessary in order to survive hardships. Both outer and inner resources are essential for survival in stories set in the wilderness.

e.g. Underneath all the chaos, there are moments of true valour in war. Being a soldier during a war is terrifying. Being a soldier requires a great deal of physical and emotional hardship. Despite all the hardships, there are times when kindness and compassion prevail. Novels of World War I portray a world of quiet humanity in the midst of desperate savagery.

Now what shall you do for a conclusion?
Just rewrite your introduction in backwards order. It would be more interesting if you could paraphrase it slightly.

e.g. Sometimes children act more like grown-ups than the adults in novels for young adults. The main character in ______ by _______ (publisher, date)not only cares for herself but helps others. S/he has to find food and shelter for herself/himself. S/he also has to protect herself/himself both physically and emotionally. Just like in real life, children often have to be very strong.

e.g. To survive in a wilderness, both outer and inner resources are essential. Maintaining a positive attitude is necessary. Building a shelter is essential. Finding sufficient food and water is critical. Characters in novels, just like in real life, can be very tough.

e.g. Novels of World War I, despite all the violence, also portray a world of quiet humanity. There are moments of kindness and compassion. Those moments are found in the midst of both physical and emotional hardship. Moreover, those altruistic moments occur in the face of terror. Uncommon bravery occurs even the midst of chaos.

 

 

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