Science Lab Criteria

Criteria for Science Lab Report

A. Question/Purpose/Hypothesis:

5: Clearly stated, reasonable, testable and includes a rationale
4: Clearly stated, testable, reasonable
3: Testable and reasonable
2.5: Incomplete

B. Materials

5: Complete and detailed
4: Complete
3: Mostly complete
2.5: Includes only major materials

C. Procedure:

5: Clearly stated and numbered steps with enough detail that another person could reliably repeat the lab; includes diagrams; focuses on the answering the question
4: Clearly stated steps that focus on answering the question
3: Includes the major steps needed to repeat the lab
2.5: Incomplete or lacking in important steps needed to repeat the lab

D. Observations:

5: Information is accurate, detailed, complete with all measurements and clearly illustrated (diagrams, charts, tables, pictures)
4: Information is accurate and complete with measurements and illustrations
3: Information is accurate but missing some measurements or illustrations
2.5: Information is unorganized, vague or unclear

E. Results:

5: Repeats the question and hypothesis and tells whether the data supported the hypothesis; includes key details
4: Repeats the question and hypothesis and tells whether the data supported the hypothesis
3: Tells whether the data supported the hypothesis
2.5: Answers the question

F. Conclusion:

5: Explains any errors made that may have been made; suggests ways of modifying or adapting the procedure; explains how the lab relates to the unit of study in class; makes connections to other areas of study or describes real life applications; includes bibliographic information
4: Explains any errors made that may have been made; suggests ways of modifying or adapting the procedure; explains how the lab relates to the unit of study in class; makes connections to other areas of study or describes real life applications
3: Repeats the question and hypothesis and tells whether the data supported the hypothesis; suggests ways of modifying or adapting the procedure; explains how the lab relates to the unit of study in class
2.5: Explains how the lab relates to the unit of study in class

G. Written Communication Skills:

5: Accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar; excellent use of scientific vocabulary; engaging style of writing; well-organized and neat
4: Mostly accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar; good use of scientific vocabulary; well-organized and neat
3: Understandable spelling, punctuation and grammar; some use of scientific vocabulary; mostly organized and legible
2.5: Mostly organized and legible with some use of scientific vocabulary

Some Examples:

In a conclusion, you should explain the science behind the experiment.

“Sound waves coming off of objects are almost like a physical motion. Waves transmit energy through space and mass, and this is what makes the salt on your saran wrap or tinfoil move. When the sound wave reaches the saran wrap…underneath the salt, it hits it like a slap to the face. This makes the saran wrap react, making it shake and move up and down, causing the salt to bounce everywhere…” Dane

In a conclusion, you may add connections from your own experiences:

“Before I did this lab, I already knew that salt could move by sound. One time I was playing drums and eating a donut at the same time. Some sugar fell onto the drums, but I didn’t feel like cleaning it up so when I played the sugar started bouncing.  I didn’t quite understand why, but now I do. Sugar and salt are very similar so I inferred that it would be the same.” Stephanie

“This lab reminded me of an episode of ‘The Big Bang Theory’ that I watched. The characters in the show placed something on top of a speaker, and they turned the music up really high, and the materials on top started to bounce around and form really weird shapes. I remember watching the episode with my mom and siblings, and I found it so interesting. She explained to me that the sound waves were causing the materials on top to bounce around like that.” Brenna

“I…think this connects to real life situations, like how our eardrums seem to vibrate every time we hear something loud or how a car playing loud music sounds like it’s vibrating which sort of influenced my hypothesis.” Alyssa

In a conclusion, you may try the experiment again, altering some of the variables:

“I tried the experiment with a guitar amp. I cranked the volume on the amp and placed it right beside the bowl. The bowl rocked and the salt went flying. I was so excited, I called my family up and gave them a demonstration. M sister ran to her room and grabbed more stuff, so for about an hour we tried lots of different things like shutting a book really hard, which worked. Then I watched a video of it on YouTube but couldn’t make the salt go in those cool shapes.” Josh

“I decided to see what would happen if I put loud electronic music up close to salt…on a silver bowl with Glad on it. I tested two songs: Gold Dust by Flux pavilion and Cinema by Skrillex. For both songs, the single strands of sugar had a lot more movement than the groups. I did notice though, that the ending shape of the salt was a lot different than the beginning. The salt did not move a lot but it moved to the bass.” Byron

 

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