Nutrition

NUTRITION

“Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are.” Anthelme Brillat-Savarin (1755-1826)

There are three major nutrients that provide energy for our bodies: protein, carbohydrates, and fats.

  In addition, our bodies need two groups of micronutrients to help us grow and maintain good health: vitamins (small organic chemicals) and minerals (small inorganic substances).

Finally, our bodies need lots of water.

Canada’s Food Guide contains four major food groups to help us make sure we get all the nutrients we need:


1. Vegetables and Fruits
            a. 9-13 year olds: 6 servings per day
b. 14-18 year old girls: 7 servings per day
c. 14-18 year old boys: 8 servings per day

Eat vegetables!
• 1/2 cup cooked carrots
• some celery sticks and carrot sticks
• 1/2 cup cooked green beans or peas
• a tomato
• 1/2 cup cooked broccoli, cauliflower or cabbage
• a glass of tomato juice
The carbohydrates in vegetables provide energy.
The vitamins and minerals in vegetables help us fight off disease and grow strong.

Eat fruits!
• a banana, an apple, an orange, a pear, a peach
• 1/2 cup of blueberries, raspberries, strawberries or blackberries
• several plums or apricots
• some dried fruit: figs, apples, pears, peaches
• a bunch of grapes or a handful of raisins
• half a glass of orange juice or grapefruit juice
The carbohydrates in fruit provide energy.
The vitamins and minerals in fruit help us fight off disease and grow strong.


2. Grain Products
            a. 9-13 year olds: 6 servings per day
b. 14-18 year old girls: 6 servings per day
c. 14-18 year old boys: 7 servings per day

Eat whole grains!
• a slice of whole grain bread
• a bowl of oatmeal
• a whole grain bagel
• a bowl of oatmeal
• a bowl of nonsugared breakfast cereal
• a cup of brown rice
• a cup of cooked quinoa
The carbohydrates in grains provide energy.
The vitamins and minerals in grains help us fight off disease and grow strong.


 3. Milk and Alternatives
        9-18 year olds: 3-4 servings per day


4. Meat and Alternatives
            9-13 year olds: 1-2 servings per day
14-18 year old girls: 2 servings per day
          14-18 year old boys: 3 servings per day

Eat protein!
• an egg
• a glass of milk, 3/4 cup of yogurt, some cheese
• a glass of soy milk
• a cup of quinoa cereal or salad
• a combination of nuts and grains (e.g. almonds and wholegrain bread)
• a combination of corn and beans (e.g. a corn tortilla and black beans)
• fish or meat (chicken, turkey, lamb, beef, pork)
Protein helps our bodies grow and provides heat and energy.
Extra stress means we need extra protein.

The Canada Food Guide also recommends the following:
    1. 30-45 mL (2-3 T.) of unsaturated fat per day
2. limited amounts of foods and beverages high in
calories, fat, sugar or salt
3. limited amounts of highly processed food
4. 90 minutes of exercise per day for youth


Avoid!
• cereals with added sugar
• yogurt with added sugar
• chips
• cakes and cookies
• pop and drink boxes with added sugar
• candy

 Do More Research

Vitamins – Benefits and Food Sources:
http://kidshealth.org/teen/misc/vitamin_chart.html

Minerals – Benefits and Food Sources:
http://kidshealth.org/teen/misc/mineral_chart.html?tracking=T_RelatedArticle

Combining for Complete Protein: Vegetarian Handout

See a short powerpoint presentation by a child in grade two: Nutrition Gr. 2

Collect more information from this powerpoint presentation: Nutrition Information

Collect more advanced information from this powerpoint presentation: Nutrients for Health

Canada’s Food Guide:
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/food-guide-aliment/index-eng.php

Nutrition:
ww.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar397360&st=nutrition

Carbohydrates:
http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar094420&st=carbohydrates

Protein:
http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar448460&st=carbohydrates

Fats:
http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar192320&st=fats

Vitamins:
http://www.worldbookonline.com/student/article?id=ar587240&st=vitamins

Vitamins and Minerals:
http://kidshealth.org/teen/food_fitness/nutrition/vitamins_minerals.html

Health and Fitness:
http://kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/

History of Food:
http://www.foodtimeline.org/

Note that neither Ms. Rosen nor school district 34  necessarily endorses or verifies the opinions and facts presented on these websites.

Eating the Alphabet

Ehlert, Lois. Eating the Alphabet. Harcourt, 1989.

 

 

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