Europe

Read your way through Europe!

Austria

Star of Kazan

Ibbotson, Eva. Star of Kazan. London: Macmillan Children’s Books, 2004.
Annika, a servant in a Viennese household, discovers the truth about her mother and finds herself on an adventure filled with suspense, danger and possibilities. (Mothers and daughters; Horses; Foster children; Frienship)

Czech Republic 

The Wall

Sis, Peter. The Wall. New York: Frances Foster Books, 2007.
“Annotated illustrations, journals, maps, and dreamscapes take readers on an extraordinary journey of how the artist-author’s life was shaped while growing up in Czechoslovakia during the Cold War, as well as the influence of western culture through the influx of banned books, music, and news, in a powerful graphic memoir.” – FVPL

England

Raven Summer

Almond, David. Raven Summer. New York : Delacorte Press, 2009, c2008.
Fourteen-year-old Liam discovers an abandoned baby in northern England which leads him to discovering two foster children who have experienced the horrors of kidnapping, terrorism and war. Recommended for competent readers 12-years-old and up.

Crispin

Avi. Crispin: the Cross of Lead. New York: Hyperion Paperbacks for Children, 2002.
“Falsely accused of theft and murder, an orphaned peasant boy in fourteenth-century England flees his village and meets a larger-than-life juggler who holds a dangerous secret.” – CIP. [Faith; Historical fiction; Middle Ages; Orphans; Priests; Runaways]

The War That Saved My Life

Bradley, Kimberly Brubaker. The War That Saved My Life. New York : Dial Books for Young Readers, 2015.

“A young disabled girl and her brother are evacuated from London to the English countryside during World War II, where they find life to be much sweeter away from their abusive mother.” – CIP. Highly recommended for readers 11 years old and up. [Abuse; Brother and sisters; Foster children; People with Disabilities; Runaways]

The London Eye Mystery

Dowd, Siobhan. The London Eye Mystery. A Yearling Book, 2007.
Ted and Kat try to find Salim who has gone missing in London, England. Will they find him or has he disappeared forever?  Ted’s unusual way of seeing the world might be their only hope for success in the search to save their cousin. Recommended for readers 10 to 13 years old. [Asperger’s syndrome; Cousins; London (England); Missing children; Mystery fiction; Siblings]

One Dog and His Boy

Ibbotson, Eva. One Dog and His Boy. New York: Scholastic, 2011.
When lonely, ten-year-old Hal learns that his wealthy but neglectful parents only rented Fleck, the dog he always wanted, he and new friend Pippa take Fleck and four other dogs from the rental agency on a trek from London to Scotland, where Hal’s grandparents live. – CIP [Dogs; Family life; Independence; Parent and child; Runaways; Voyages and travels]

Medina Hill

Kent, Trilby. Medina Hill. Toronto : Tundra Books, 2009.
Eleven-year-old Dominic and his younger sister Marlo are sent from London to Cornwall to stay with their Uncle Roo and Aunt Sylv for the summer. Set in 1935, this detailed novel is filled with historical references which will appeal to readers ten-years-old and up who enjoy learning about the past by reading stories. [Family life; Friendship; Lawrence of Arabia; Mutism; Romanies; Summer; Vacations]

Jewel of the Thames

Misri, Angela. Jewel of the Thames. [Canada]: Fierce Ink Press, 2014.

“Set against the background of 1930s England, Jewel of the Thames introduces Portia Adams, a budding detective with an interesting – and somewhat mysterious – heritage.” – CIP. The first in a trilogy, this entertaining novel will appeal to readers 12 to 16 years of age who enjoy Sherlock Holmes stories. [Canadian fiction; Criminals; London (Eng.); Orphans; Sherlock Holmes (Fictional character); Young adult fiction]

Reiss, Kathryn. Blackthorn Winter. Orlando: Harcourt, 2006.
Fifteen-year-old Juliana thinks that her mother has taken her and her siblings on holiday when they leave California and travel to a small town in southwest England. But she soon discovers her parents have separated and her mother plans to stay in the small artists’ colony. Life becomes even more complicated when she gets involved with a new boyfriend who tries to help her solve a murder. A action-packed novel sure to be enjoyed by readers in grades seven to ten. [Murder; Artists; Family life; Mystery and detective stories; Young adult fiction]

Forged in the Fire

Turnbull, Ann. Forged in the Fire. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press 2007.
In this sequel to No Shame, No Fear, Susanna and William move to London where they face new challenges. [Historical fiction; Plague; Love; Marriage; Middle Ages; Renaissance; Quakers; Faith; Young adult fiction]

No Shame, No Fear

Turnbull, Ann. No Shame, No Fear. Cambridge, MA Candlewick Press 2003.
Fifteen-year-old Susanna, a poor Quaker, and seventeen-year-old William, a wealthy Anglican, meet and fall in love, much to the dismay of their parents. [Historical fiction; Love; Marriage; Middle Ages; Renaissance; Quakers; Faith; Young adult fiction]

France

The Cat Who Walked Across France

Banks, Kate. The Cat Who Walked Across France. New York: Frances Foster Books, 2004.

“After his owner dies, a cat wanders across the countryside of France, unable to forget the home he had in the stone house by the edge of the sea.” – CIP. A quiet picture book for readers 7-years-old and up. [Cats; France; Home] 

Brunhoff, Laurent de. Babar’s Guide to Paris. New York: Abrams Books for Young Readers, 2017.
Babar advises his daughter Isabelle on all the sights to see on her travels to the famed city of Paris. A lovely travel guide for younger readers! [Elephants; Paris (France); Voyages and travels]

Dodsworth in Paris

Egan, Tim. Dodsworth in Paris. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008. 

“When Dodsworth and the duck vacation in Paris, they have a grand time despite running out of money and accidentally riding their bicycles in the Tour de France.” – CIP. A cheerful and informative picture book for readers 7-years-old and up. [Ducks; Paris (France); Voyages and travels]

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Ellis, Deborah. No Safe Place. Berkeley, CA: Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, 2010. 

“Fifteen-year-old Abdul, having lost everyone he loves, journeys from Baghdad to a migrant community in Calais where he sneaks aboard a boat bound for England, not knowing it carries a cargo of heroin, and when the vessel is involved in a skirmish and the pilot killed, it is up to Abdul and three other young stowaways to complete the journey.” – CIP. A realistic novel about a modern social issue.  Recommended for mature readers 12-years-old and up. [Criminals; England; France; Iraqis; Stowaways; Teenagers] 

Giff, Patricia Reilly. Genevieve’s War. New York: Holiday House, 2017.
August of 1939. Summer is over. Time to leave France and go home to America. But thirteen-year-old Genevieve decides – at the last moment – to stay with her grandmother in the small Alsatian village rather than return to New York. Mere months later, Nazi soldiers arrive and life changes.
This story is among the best of Giff’s many novels. Who are your friends? Whom can you trust? For whom will you risk your life? All these questions are quietly and skillfully addressed in a compelling novel for readers 11 years old and up. [Courage; France; Grandmothers; Love; Orphans; Self-reliance; Underground movements; World War, 1939-1945]

On the Road Again

Gay, Marie-Louise. On the Road Again. Berkeley, CA: Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, 2008.

“Charlie describes his experiences living with his family in a small village in France.” – CIP. A short novel, by a Canadian writer, highly recommended for readers who like to laugh at the craziness of family life. [Adventure stories; Family life; France; Humorous stories; Villages]

The Silver Donkey

Hartnett, Sonya. The Silver Donkey. Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2014. 

“In France during World War I, four French children learn about honesty, loyalty, and courage from an English army deserter who tells them a series of stories related to his small, silver donkey charm.” – CIP. A quiet novel for introspective readers 11 to 14 years old. [Conduct of life; France; Historical fiction; Soldiers; Storytelling; World War, 1914-1918]

The Pull of the Ocean

Mourlevat, Jean-Claude. The Pull of the Ocean. New York: Laurel-Leaf Books, 2009, c2006.

“Loosely based on Charles Perrault’s “Tom Thumb,” seven brothers in modern-day France flee their poor parents’ farm, led by the youngest who, although mute and unusually small, is exceptionally wise.” – CIP. This quietly compelling award-winning novel if highly recommended for competent readers 11-years-old and up. [Brothers; France; Poverty; Runaways; Twins] 

Rubbino, Salvatore. A Walk in Paris. Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2014. 

An illustrated picture book guide sure to appeal to readers young and old.

The Watcher in the Shadows

Zafon, Carlos Ruiz. The Watcher in the Shadows. New York: Little, Brown and Co., 2013.
“When fourteen-year-old Irene Sauvelle moves with her family to Cape House on the coast of Normandy, she’s immediately taken by the beauty of the place–its expansive cliffs, coasts, and harbors. There, she meets a local boy named Ismael, and the two soon fall in love. But a dark mystery is about to unfold, involving a reclusive toymaker who lives in a gigantic mansion filled with mechanical beings and shadows of the past”– Provided by publisher. [Families; Historical fiction; Inventors; Mystery and detective stories; Robots; Shadows; Supernatural]

Germany

Going Over

Kephart, Beth. Going Over. San Francisco: Chronicle Books, 2014.
“In the early 1980s Ada and Stefan are young, would-be lovers living on opposite sides of the Berlin Wall–Ada lives with her mother and grandmother and paints graffiti on the Wall, and Stefan lives with his grandmother in the East and dreams of escaping to the West.” – CIP. Told from alternate points of view, this fast-moving novel is recommended for readers in grade 8 to 10. [Berlin; Germany; Graffiti; Historical fiction; Love stories; Young adult]

A Night Divided

Nielsen, Jennifer A. A Night Divided. New York: Scholastic Press, 2015.

When the Berlin Wall went up, Gerta, her mother, and her brother Fritz are trapped on the eastern side where they were living, while her father, and her other brother Dominic are in the West–four years later, now twelve, Gerta sees her father on a viewing platform on the western side and realizes he wants her to risk her life trying to tunnel to freedom.” – CIP. Highly recommended for readers 11 to 16-years-old. [Berlin Wall; Courage; Germany; Secrets; Tunnels]

Greece 

War Games

Couloumbis, Audrey. War Games. New York: Random House Children’s Books, 2009.
This novel, based on a true story, describes life for twelve-year-old Petros when German soldiers invade his Greek village during World War 2. Quarrels with his older brother Zola fade away when a Nazi commander takes up residence in their small home and they must quickly hide all belongings that might betray their American background.  Games of marbles give way to a greater challenge: how to hide their older cousin who has escaped German custody.  Masterfully told by a Newbery Honor author, this story will engage readers eleven-years-old and up. It might especially appeal to readers of The Boy in the Striped Pajamas.  [Greece; Historical fiction; World War 2; Brothers; Farm life; Secrets; Courage; Cousins] 

Held

Ravel, Edeet. Held. New York: Annick Press, 2011.

“Seventeen-year-old Chloe, vacationing in Greece, struggles to remain calm when she is drugged, kidnapped, and held in a warehouse pending a prisoner exchange.” – CIP.  A fascinating and compelling novel for competent young adult readers. [Greece; Hostages; Kidnapping; Stockholm syndrome]

Iceland

How the Ladies Stopped the Wind

McMillan, Bruce. How the Ladies Stopped the Wind. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2007.

“The women of one village in Iceland decide to plant trees to stop the powerful winds that make it difficult even to go for a walk, but first they must find a ways to prevent sheep from eating all of their saplings, while encouraging chickens to fertilize them.” – CIP. A humorous picture book. [Chickens; Iceland; Trees; Wind]

The Problem with Chickens

McMillan, Bruce. The Problem with Chickens. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005.

“When women in an Icelandic village buy chickens to lay eggs for them to use, the chickens follow them, adopting human ways and forgetting their barnyard roots, until the ladies hatch a clever plan.” – CIP. A humorous picture book. [Chickens; Humorous stories; Iceland]

Ireland

Click HERE for stories set in Ireland.

Italy

Dodsworth in Rome

Egan, Tim. Dodsworth in Rome. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Books for Children, 2011.

“Dodsworth and his duck companion have a lovely time in Rome, even though the duck tries to improve the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and takes all the coins from the Trevi Fountain.” – CIP. An entertaining and informative picture book for readers 7-years-old and up. [Ducks; Italy; Voyages and travels]

Olivia Goes to Venice

Falconer, Ian. Olivia Goes to Venice. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2010.

“On a family vacation in Venice, Olivia indulges in gelato, rides in a gondola, and finds the perfect souvenir.” – CIP. An amusing picture book for readers 7-years-old and up. [Italy, Pigs; Vacations]

Inkheart

Funke, Cornelia. Inkheart. New York: Chicken House/Scholastic, 2007, 2003.

“Twelve-year-old Meggie learns that her father Mo, a bookbinder, can “read” fictional characters to life when an evil ruler named Capricorn, freed from the novel “Inkheart” years earlier, tries to force Mo to release an immortal monster from the story.” – CIP. A wonderful novel highly recommended for imaginative and adventurous readers 11 to 14-years-old. [Authorship; Books and reading; Bookbinding; Fantasy fiction; Italy; Magic]

The Last Girls of Pompeii

Lasky, Kathryn. The Last Girls of Pompeii. New York: Viking, 2007. 

“Twelve-year-old Julia knows that her physical deformity will keep her from a normal life, but counts on the continuing friendship of her life-long slave, Mitka, until they learn that both of their futures in first-century Pompeii are about to change for the worse.” – CIP. Highly recommended novel for avid readers 11-years-old and up. [Family life; Friendship; Handicapped; Historical fiction; Italy; Slavery; Vesuvius (Italy)]

The Mozart Question

Morpurgo, Michael. The Mozart Question. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick Press, 2008, c2006.

“A young journalist goes to Venice, Italy, to interview a famous violinist, who tells the story of his parents’ incarceration by the Nazis, and explains why they can no longer listen to the music of Mozart.” – CIP. A thoughtful novel for introspective readers 12-years-old and up. [Historical fiction; Holocaust, 1939-1945; Italy; Musicians; Violins]

Kosovo

Day of the Pelican

Paterson, Katherine. The Day of the Pelican. Clarion Books, 2009.
Thirteen-year-old Meli’s family, ethnic Albanians, flee the fighting in 1998, travelling from one refugee camp to another until they reach America.  [Courage; Fear; Faith; Historical fiction; Homelessness; Immigrants;  Muslims; Refugees; War]
“Think of that one day where you did something wrong, the day you are pretty sure affected your whole future and those around you. Imagine your feelings: desperation, guilt, shame and a longing to go back and change that day. This is how Meli Lleshi fromThe Day of the Pelican by Katherine Paterson (Clarion Books, 2009) feels all the time after her family is forced to flee their city. She thinks that just because she drew a rude picture of her teacher, which led to her brother being beaten and jailed, the Serbians are going to attack her home and family. Even after, when they are in a refugee camp, safe and protected, her mind takes her back to that dreadful day where everything changed. Now they are in America and there is “a new beginning” as her father says, a new beginning of hope, peace and freedom. But even this does not last long. Soon after the 9/11 attack, everyone is paranoid and wicked glances are thrown in her direction and she is treated as if she is a terrorist, as if this is all her fault. Will her family ever fit in and go back to living a life of happiness?” (Ilar in grade eight)

Netherlands

I Am Rembrandt's Daughter

Cullen, Lynn. I am Rembrandt’s Daughter. Bloomsbury Children’s Books, 2007.
Cornelia, living in poverty as the illegitimate child of renowned painter Rembrandt in 17th century Amsterdam, finds hope when she meets a wealthy suitor. [Fathers and daughters; Historical fiction; Plague; Poverty; Rembrandt Harmenszoon Van Rijn; Renaissance]

The Hunger Journeys

De Vries, Maggie. Hunger Journeys. Toronto: HarperTrophyCanada, 2010.

Lena and her friend Sofie use false identity cards and help from two German soldiers to escape from Nazi-occupied Amsterdam.  A suspense-filled award-winning novel for mature readers, due to the sexual references. [WW 2; Netherlands; Soldiers; Friendship; Survival; Family problems; Teenagers; Young adult fiction] Click HERE to read a reader’s response to this novel.

Nine Open Arms

Lindelauf, Benny. Nine Open Arms. New York: Enchanted Lion Books, 2014.

In 1937, three daughters, four sons, a father and a grandmother move to the deserted house at the end of a long road in the Dutch countryside. But what starts as a simple story of moving to a new home turns into a historical drama and romantic ghost story. Translated from the Dutch, this novel will appeal to imaginative readers 11 to 14-years-old. [Family life; Grandmothers; Historical fiction; Moving, Household; Netherlands; Romanies; Single-parent families]

Norway

Harvey, Matthea & Giselle Potter. Cecil the Pet Glacier. New York: Schwartz & Wade Books, 2012.

Ruby, on holiday with her eccentric parents in Norway, discovers she is being followed by a small glacier determined to be her pet. A quietly humorous picture book with hidden depths. Highly recommended for readers – and listeners – 5 years old and up. Useful, as well, for teaching adolescents how to discover themes in novels. [Eccentrics and eccentricities; Glaciers; Norway; Pets; Vacations]

Poland

Anna and the Swallow Man

Savit, Gavriel. Anna and the Swallow Man. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2016.

“When her university professor father is sent by the Gestapo to a concentration camp, seven-year-old Anna travels the Polish countryside with the mysterious Swallow Man during World War II.” – CIP. So much has to be inferred in this story told from the third person point of view but only revealing the thoughts of the main character. This imaginative novel is highly recommended for competent readers 12-years-old and up.  [Poland; Runaways; Survival; WW 2]

Russia

The Wolf Wilder

Rundell, Katherine. The Wolf Wilder. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2015.

“In the days before the Russian Revolution, twelve-year-old Feodora sets out to rescue her mother when the Tsar’s Imperial Army imprisons her for teaching tamed wolves to fend for themselves.” – FVRL. “A slightly different version of this work was originally published in 2015 in Great Britain by Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.” – T.p. verso. This story of courage with the echo of a powerful myth is recommended for all readers 11 years old and up. [Historical fiction; Mothers and daughters; St. Petersburg (Russia); Survival; Wolves]

Between Shades of Gray

Sepetys, Ruta. Between Shades of Gray. New York: Speak, 2012, c2011.

“In 1941, fifteen-year-old Lina, her mother, and brother are pulled from their Lithuanian home by Soviet guards and sent to Siberia, where her father is sentenced to death in a prison camp while she fights for her life, vowing to honor her family and the thousands like hers by burying her story in a jar on Lithuanian soil. Based on the author’s family, includes a historical note.” – CIP.  For mature readers.  [Historical fiction; Labor camps; Lithuania; Russia; Siberia; Survivalism]
 
 
Tolstikova, Dasha. A Year Without Mom. Toronto: Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, 2015.
Twelve-year-old Dasha remains with her grandparents when her mother moves to the U.S. to attend university. She spends time with her friends, falls in love, studies for exams, and attends art classes on the weekends. This autobiographical graphic novel is humorous in its vivid depiction of the emotional life of an adolescent. Dasha might live in Russia but her turmoils are similar to those of seventh-graders in the U.S. and Canada. Recommended for readers 11 to 16 years old. [Moscow; Mothers and daughters; Schools; Tolstikova, Dasha]

Yelchin, Eugene. Arcady’s Goal. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 2014.

“When twelve-year-old Arcady is sent to a children’s home after his parents are declared enemies of the state in Soviet Russia, soccer becomes a way to secure extra rations, respect, and protection but it may also be his way out if he can believe in and love another person–and himself.” – CIP. Recommended for readers 11-years-old and up. [Communism; Foster children; Russia; Soccer]

Yelchin, Eugene. Breaking Stalin’s Nose. New York: Henry Holt, 2011.
This novel, a Newbery Honor book, tells the story of ten-year-old Sasha who adores his father who works for the secret police in Stalinist Russia. But his perspective changes when he discovers secrets about his deceased mother and his father is unexpectedly arrested, leaving Sasha homeless in the middle of winter.  While easy to read, this powerful story is best suited for brave readers aged eleven and up. [Communism; Fathers and sons; Homelessness; Russia; Secrets] 

Yelchin, Eugene. The Haunting of Falcon House.  New York: Henry Holt and Company, 2016. 

“In 1891, twelve-year-old Lev Lvov travels to Saint Petersburg, Russia, to assume his duties as Prince, but must first use his special gift to rid the House of Lions of a ghost.” – CIP. Written by Prince Lev Lvov with pictures drawn in his own hand; translated by Eugene Yelchin who writes in the preface, “when I was a schoolboy in St. Petersburg, Russia,…I came upon a bundle of paper held together with frayed twine….Some years passed….Resolved to faithfully restore Lvov’s original narration, I set to work. To carry Prince Lev’s feelings across to the reader, I became inwardly connected to the young prince…” A spell-binding story for readers 11 to 14 years old. [Aunts; Extrasensory perception; Haunted houses; Orphans; Princes]

Scotland

Wild Wings

Lewis, Gill. Wild Wings. New York : Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2011. 

“Callum becomes friends with Iona, a practically feral classmate who has discovered an osprey, thought to be gone from Scotland, on Callum’s family farm, and they eventually share the secret with others, including Jeneba who encounters the same bird at her home in Gambia.” – FVRL. A happy story with a serious message. Recommended for readers, 9 to 12 years old, who enjoy straight-forward novels. [Birds; Farm life; Friendship; Gambia; Osprey; Scotland]

Spain

Don Quixote

Nichols, Barbara. Tales of Don Quixote. Plattsburgh, N.Y.: Tundra Books of Northern New York, c2004.

“An aging Don Quixote attempts to rekindle his youth by traveling the Spanish countryside searching for damsels in distress and injustices to be mended.” – CIP. This wonderful retelling of the classic by Cervantes is highly recommended for competent readers 12-years-old and up. [Don Quixote (Fictional character); Knights and knighthood; Spain]

Nichols, Barbara. Tales of Don Quixote Book II. Toronto, Ont.: Tundra Books ; Plattsburgh, N.Y.: Tundra Books of Northern New York, 2006. 

“An aging Don Quixote attempts to rekindle his youth by traveling the Spanish countryside searching for damsels in distress and injustices to be mended.” – CIP. [Don Quixote (Fictional character); Knights and Knighthood; Quests (Expeditions); Spain.

Sweden 

A Faraway Island

Thor, Annika. A Faraway Island. Delacorte Press, 2009.
Twelve-year-old Stephie and eight-year-old Nellie are sent away from their parents in Austria to live with strangers in Sweden in 1939 . Nellie lives with a happy loving family, but Stephie does not. Nellie has fun at school, but Stephie does not. Stephie wants her parents to come, but they do not. Based on the experiences of children sent to safety in Sweden during the war, this novel will appeal to readers 11 to 14 years old. [Sweden; WW 2; Jews; Immigration; Foster children; Loneliness; Bullies; Sisters; Historical fiction; Courage; Refugees]

The Lily Pond

Thor, Annika. The Lily Pond. New York : Delacorte Press, 2011.

“Having left Nazi-occupied Vienna a year ago, thirteen-year-old Jewish refugee Stephie Steiner adapts to life in the cultured Swedish city of Gothenburg, where she attends school, falls in love, and worries about her parents who were not allowed to emigrate.” – CIP. This sequel to A Faraway Island  is recommended for readers who enjoy a bit of romance. [Jews; Foster children; Friendship; School stories; Historical fiction; Refugees; WW2; Loneliness]

Switzerland

Bloomability

Creech, Sharon. Bloomability. New York: Scholastic, 1998.

This “is a story full of suspense. Dinnie – also known as Dominica Santolina Doone – and her family have followed their father around the United States from Kentucky to North Carolina, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Oregon, Texas, California, and New Mexico. Finally, Dinnie is sent to live with her Aunt and Uncle in Switzerland who are complete strangers, and when she goes to school there, she meets some pretty crazy people. Back home, life isn’t going so well for her siblings: Dinnie’s older sister is pregnant and her brother Crick is sent to jail. When Dinnie eventually makes friends in Switzerland, her life is thrown into turmoil again when her best friends, Guthrie and Lila, are trapped by an avalanche while on the school’s annual skiing trip, and Dinnie sees it all happen. Will Guthrie and Lila be okay? Will Dinnie finally find a sense of belonging? You’ll have to read to find out.” – Jezerah in grade 7

The Unfinished Angel

Creech, Sharon. The Unfinished Angel.  New York: Joanna Cotler Books, 2009.

Life triumphs over grief in all of Creech’s novels. Mysteries abound. And this novel is no exception. In the Swiss Alps, Zola moves with her father into an old stone house and meets an angel who narrates the story: “What is my mission? I think I should have been told. I have been looking around in the stone tower of Casa Rosa, waiting to find out” (p. 2). This angel is as confused about life as anyone: “Maybe you think I should just fly up to heaven and ask some questions, but it is not that easy. I do not know where heaven is nor where the angel training center is nor where any other angels are. And yes, I have looked” (p. 19). But when Zola decides to help some homeless orphans, everyone in the village starts to find new purpose and happiness.  Humorous and lively, this hopeful and easy-to-read story is sure to be enjoyed by imaginative readers of all ages. [Angels; Orphans; Switzerland; Village life]

Banner in the Sky

Ullman, James. Banner in the Sky. New York: HarperTrophy, 1988, c1954.

“Sixteen-year-old Rudi dreams of being the first to climb the highest mountain in Switzerland.” – CIP. This award-winning classic novel of growing up is highly recommended for readers 11-years-old and up. [Alps (Switzerland); Coming of age; Mothers and sons; Mountaineering]

Wales

Framed

Boyce, Frank Cottrell. Framed. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.

“Dylan and his sisters have some ideas about how to make Snowdonia Oasis Auto Marvel into a more profitable business, but it is not until some strange men arrive in their small town of Manod, Wales with valuable paintings, and their father disappears, that they consider turning to crime.” – CIP. [Art; Automobiles; Business enterprises; Eccentrics and eccentricities; Family life; Wales]

Lost Boy

Newbery, Linda. Lost Boy. New York: David Fickling Books, 2007.

“Eleven-year-old Matt Lanchester moves to the small Welsh town of Hay-on-Wye and becomes entangled in his new friends’ attempts to punish an old local man for the accidental death of a boy who shared Matt’s initials–and soon Matt feels that the dead boy is haunting him.” – CIP. [Ghost stories; Mystery stories; Traffic accidents; Wales]

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