Picture Books

Looking for picture books for children aged 4 – 9?
Lots of great books are listed on this page:

Books for Babysitters

Find ways of categorizing picture books:
Picture Book Patterns

Find examples of stylistic devices:
Picture Books for Writers

Find examples of artistic techniques:
Picture Books for Artists

Find even more recommended picture books right here!

Zagarenski, Pamela. Henry & Leo. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2016.
What makes us real? Lovers of The Velveteen Rabbit will appreciate this gentle story about Henry and his toy lion. Written and illustrated by a two-time Caldecott Honor winner, this picture book is a  wonderful read-aloud for young children and a conversation starter for older readers.

We Are All Born Free

We are All Born Free : the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in PicturesLondon: Frances Lincoln Children’s Books, 2008. 

“Presents a simplified version of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each of the 30 articles is depicted by an internationally renowned artist. Includes portraits and brief biographies of artists. All royalties from the sale of the book will be donated to the organization.” – CIP. Includes an introduction by author John Boyne and actor David Tennant. Highly recommended for all ages. 

Magic Little Words

Delaunois, Angèle. Magic Little Words. Toronto: Owlkids Books, 2015.

A gentle story that teaches simple words that build relationships: good morning; welcome; I’m sorry; I love you; rest in peace; bon voyage; bravo; please; thank you; good bye; and good night. Translated from the French and illustrated with collages by Manon Gauthier. Useful as an introduction to a unit on manners for elementary and middle school readers. 

If Not for You

Dylan, Bob. If Not for You. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2016.

“An interpretation of the lyrics to Bob Dylan’s 1970 song, ‘If Not For You,’ reimagined to portray the love between parent and child”– Provided by publisher.

Listen to Our World

Martin Jr., Bill and Michael Sampson. Listen to Our World. New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2016.

“Youngsters awaken in the morning with the belief that they are the greatest little ones in the world, whether they are children in their mothers’ arms, eagles soaring above mountains, whales swimming in the ocean, or other animals in their domains.” – CIP. Illustrated by Caldecott Honor artist Melissa Sweet. A wonderful read-aloud for teaching the use of powerful language!

There is a Tribe of Kids

Smith, Lane. There is a Tribe of Kids. New York: Roaring Brook Press, 2016.

A young boy goes on an adventure, meeting all sorts of animals in this picture book for readers up to nine years of age. A great read-aloud for teaching collective nouns!

What If...?

Browne, Anthony. What If…? Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2014, c2013. 

A little boy worries that he will not enjoy the party to which he’s been invited. Another vividly illustrated picture book by a master storyteller who specializes in showing life from various points of view. Highly recommended for young readers. 

Circle

Baker, Jeannie. Circle. Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2016.

Another outstanding picture book by an accomplished artist and storyteller. Recommended for readers eight-years-old and up. “Each year, bar-tailed godwits undertake the longest unbroken migration of any bird, flying from their breeding grounds in the Arctic to Australia and New Zealand and back again. They follow invisible pathways–pathways that have been followed for thousands of years–while braving hunger and treacherous conditions to reach their destination. In Circle, Jeannie Baker follows the godwit’s incredible flight, taking us over awe-inspiring scenes as the birds spread their wings above such beautiful landmarks as the Great Barrier Reef and China’s breathtaking cityscapes.” – CIP.

School's First Day of School

Rex, Adam. School’s First Day of School. New York: Roaring Brook Press, 2016.

A humorous story about a building that is nervous about it’s first day of school. Excellent as a read-aloud for kindergarten children, of course, but also for students starting grades one to three. It could also be used for teaching point of view and creative writing with older students. 

Rules of the House

Barnett, Mac. Rules of the House. Los Angeles: Disney/Hyperion, 2016.

“Ian always follows the rules and his sister, Jenny, never does but when she angers some monsters while breaking all the rules of their vacation house in the woods, Ian first runs away, then realizes there should be a rule about protecting your sister from being eaten by monsters.” – CIP. A humorous story with a philosophical slant for readers of all ages. 

The Toy Brother

Steig, William. The Toy Brother. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 2016, c1996.

“An apprentice alchemist finds that his despised little brother is the only one who can help him when he concocts a potion which makes him the size of a peanut.” – CIP. A funny story by an accomplished storyteller and illustrator. 

Good Luck

Borden, Louise. Good Luck, Mrs. K!  New York : Margaret K. McElderry Books, 1999.

Ann and her classmates love their third grade teacher. So they all miss her when she becomes ill with cancer. What can they do to let her know they have not forgotten her? And when she will return to them?  A heart-warming book based on a true story for grades 2 to 4.

Cantrell, Charlie. A Friend for Einstein: The Smallest Stallion. Disney/Hyperion Books, 2011.
Full-page photographs illustrate this nonfiction picture book about a tiny miniature horse.  Perfect for horse lovers.

 

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Foreman, Michael. A Child’s Garden: A Story of Hope. Somerville, Mass. : Candlewick Press, 2009.
Living in ruin and rubble with a wire fence and soldiers separating him from the cool hills where his father used to take him as a small child, a boy’s tiny, green plant shoot gives him hope in a bleak landscape. – CIP [Gardens; Hope; Poverty; War]

Picture 16Polacco, Patricia. Bun Bun Button. G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2011.
If you’ve enjoyed The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams  and A Chair for My Mother by Vera B. Williams, don’t miss this endearing story about a little girl who loves cuddling with her grandmother in the Old Blue Chair and playing with her stuffed rabbit who is lost and then found again.

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak (Scholastic, 2002) is a story about a young boy named Max who goes into his dreams. One night, Max is terrorizing his house and gets sent to his room before dinner so he doesn`t even get to eat. Soon after, he lies down in his bed and drifts off to sleep and awakens in his dreams. When he awakes, he is on a boat but quickly finds land. When he gets ashore, he is greeted by many huge looking beasts. He does not know that they are just as afraid of him as he is of them. Max becomes their leader and they spend the rest of the day playing games and just having fun. Overall, I think this book would be good for you if you are looking for a good laugh (Ryan H.)

Picture 17Solheim, James. Born Yesterday. Philomel Books, 2010.
If you’ve read Peter’s Chair by Ezra Jack Keats or Bye-bye Baby! by Richard Morris, you know stories about older siblings who aren’t too pleased about the arrival of new babies. But this picture book tells the story from the perspective of the younger sibling.  Full of fun, this imaginative journal would be a great gift for young families, perfect as a read-aloud for primary school children and useful for teaching writing in intermediate grades. (Ms. Rosen)

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss is a book about two kids who go by the names of Sam and Sally. On a boring rainy day, the two children are trapped inside with nothing to do. They are just sitting by the window watching the rain fall to the ground, trapping them from all the fun possibilities, so they think. All of a sudden, the Cat in the Hat flares through the door. He tries to play some fun games with them. At first the kids aren’t too enthusiastic, so the Cat in the Hat throws a curveball and brings out Things one and two. The kids start to have fun until they remember their mother is going to be home soon and they have to clean up fast. I really enjoyed this book, even though it isn’t suitable for the grade eight reading level. Nevertheless, just for fun, I thought I’d go back to old times and review this book that rhymes!. (Tyler in grade eight)

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Best Kid In The World by Peter H. Reynolds is a funny picture book. It teaches kids a lesson. Just because your the youngest does not mean you don’t have to work to get an award. Just because someone has something you don’t doesn’t mean you have to complain about it. But in the end, somehow you work for what you want and get it. Yes you may get in trouble for some mistakes but you can still keep going and try try try! So in conclusion, this book is a good example for any age! (Brooke)

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Rubbino, Salvatore. A Walk in London. Somerville, Mass.: Candlewick Press, 2011.
This marvellous picture book, full of historical facts, features many of the famous sites of one of the greatest cities on earth.  Wonderful entertainment for adventuresome readers eight to eighty years old. [London; England]

One of my favourite books is Green Eggs and Ham. Firstly, it is one of my favourites because it is a classic. Secondly, it has to do with eggs and ham; I like food. Lastly, I like Sam, Sam I Am. In conclusion, Green Eggs and Ham is one of my favourite books. (Quinton)

One of my favourite books is If I Ran the Zoo.  First of all, it was written by Dr. Seuss. Secondly, it’s about a boy who imagines what he would do he ran the zoo and I do the same things: I imagine all sorts of things. Thirdly, I like the pictures of the made-up animals . If I Ran the Zoo is my favourite book. (Devon)

Tillman, Nancy. On the Night You Were Born. Feiwel and Friends, 2006.
A lovely picture book for young parents or preschoolers, this poetic story celebrates the importance of each person who is born on this earth. It could be compared to You Were Loved Before You Were Born by Eve Bunting. [Babies — Fiction; Love — Fiction]

 

Whelan, Gloria. Waiting for the Owl’s Call. Chelsea, MI: Sleeping Bear Press, 2009.
Eight-year-old Zulviya belongs to a family of rug weavers. As she spends her days tying thousands of knots, she imagines the colours of the landscape around her, the sights and sounds of her country of Afghanistan. Suitable for children 7 years old and up, this story would also be useful in writing classes, due to all the five senses details, and in Social Studies classes. [Afghanistan; Child labour; Rugs; Imagination; Turkmenistan; Girls; Sex role; Style, Literary – Study and teaching]

Picture 19Wood, Douglas. Nothing to Do. Dutton Children’s Books, 2006.
Full of softly coloured, finely detailed illustrations, this picture book is a great read-aloud and discussion starter for students in grades three and up. Reminiscent of William Davies’ poem, Leisure, it celebrates the joys of relaxing. [Imagination; Play; Adventure and adventurers]
“What is this life if, full of care,
We have no time to stand and stare.
No time to stand beneath the boughs
And stare as long as sheep or cows.
No time to see, when woods we pass,
Where squirrels hide their nuts in grass.
No time to see, in broad daylight,
Streams full of stars, like skies at night….” (Ms. Rosen)

Ehrhardt, Karen. This Jazz Man. Harcourt, 2006.
Following the pattern of the song, “This Old Man”, this picture book introduces nine jazz musicians, including Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, with short summaries of each provided at the end of the story. [Musicians; Jazz; African Americans; Stories in rhyme] (Ms. Rosen)

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McGhee, Alison. Always. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2009.
An elegantly simple story about faithful love, the story will be enjoyed by dog lovers everywhere. (Dogs; Loyalty; Imagination; Friendship) (Ms. Rosen)

 

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Dubuc, Marianne. In Front of My House. Kids Can Press, 2010.
A circular story, reminiscent of If You Give Mouse a Cookie, this cheerfully suspenseful picture book is wonderful for reading aloud to a primary class or reading aloud together with students in grades three and four. Everyone will make predictions and laugh as the pages are turned to reveal the next surprise. (Ms. Rosen)

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Yates, Louise. Dog Loves Books. Alfred A. Knopf, 2010.
Another joyous picture book celebrating the joys of reading. (Dogs; Bookstores; Imagination; Reading) (Ms. Rosen)

Polacco, Patricia. Emma Kate. Philomel Books, 2005.
Dedicated to Dr. Seuss and Horton, this charming picture book tells the story of Emma Kate and her best friend, an elephant, who do everything together. A great read-aloud for kindergarten to grade four, this book would also be useful for teaching how to draw texture with a pencil and for teaching creative writing. (Imagination; Elephants; Friendship) (Ms. Rosen)

 Sierra, Judy. Born to Read. Alfred A. Knopf, 2008.
Sam’s love of reading saves the day when a baby giant comes stomping through the town in this humorous rhyming story that refers to various picture books classics. A great read-aloud for kindergarten to grade three, it would also be a wonderful gift for any elementary school teacher. (Books and reading; Humorous stories; Monsters; Stories in rhyme) (Ms. Rosen)

Bottner, Barbara. Wallace’s Lists. Katherine Tegen Books, 2004.
Wallace, the mouse, learns to enjoy spontenanity and adventures when he becomes friends with his neighbour, Albert, in this picture book for grades one to three. It could be compared to Courage by Bernard Waber. (Humorous stories, Mice; Adventure and adventurers; Friendship; Courage) (Ms. Rosen)

Clements, Andrew. The Handiest Things in the World. Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2010.
Written by a well-known author and illustrated with full-page photographs, this concept book about hands would be a wonderful addition to any primary school collection. (Ms. Rosen)

Pinkney, Jerry. The Lion & the Mouse. Little, Brown & Co., 2009.
A wordless retelling of the classic story with gently painted illustrations filled with tiny details. The use of colour could be compared to the picture books of Brian Wildsmith. (Ms. Rosen)

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