Who will be my friend?

Colfer, Eoin. Imaginary Fred. New York: Harper, 2015.
Loneliness is awful. An imaginary friend might help. But what if a real friend comes along? What will happen to the imaginary friend? How will he feel?
This delightful picture book by an absolutely brilliant team – Eoin Colfer and Oliver Jeffers – is pure joy. The fanciful story and whimsical illustrations will bring laughter to readers of all ages. Recommended for ages 5 and up.

More stories of individual creativity HERE.

More stories to make you laugh HERE.

More picture books HERE.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Thank you, Beatrix Potter!

A Celebration of Beatrix Potter: Art and Letters by More Than 30 of Today’s Favorite Children’s Book Illustrators. New York: Penguin Young Readers Group, 2016.
Artists pay tribute to Beatrix Potter in this celebration of her stories. Tomie de Paolo, Peter H. Reynolds, Rosemary Wells, David Wiesner and 28 more illustrators tell how the famous stories influenced them and share their own unique illustrations to commemorate the 150th anniversary in 2016.
The letters will intrigue older readers who fondly remember the stories from their own childhood. Both the letters and illustrations are highly recommended for teacher-librarians and classroom teachers to use as part of a unit on styles of illustration. [Animals in art; Authors; Illustrators; Beatrix Potter]

More books about art HERE.

More picture books for artists HERE.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Who will speak up?

Kreller, Susan. You Can’t See Elephants. New York: G.P. Putnam’s Sons, 2015.
Two children are beaten by their parents and no one does anything about it. No one in the neighbourhood says a word. Except 13-year-old Mascha. Sent to live with her grandparents for the summer, she befriends Julia and Max. And courageously tries to rescue them.
This insightful award-winning novel – translated from the German by Elizabeth Gaffney – will appeal to thoughtful readers 11 years old and up. [Brothers and sisters; Child abuse; Germany; Grandparents; Parent and child]

More stories of individuality HERE.

More stories of child abuse HERE.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Look at it another way…

Freedman, Deborah. This House, Once. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2017.
Before your house was a house, what was it? Trees. Rocks. Mud. Sand. This elegantly illustrated picture book will intrigue readers and listeners 5 years old and up.
(If you like to analyze books, notice how the colour and style of the font complement the colour and size of the illustrations, creating a reflective tone that matches the mood of the story.)

More picture books HERE.

Stories that see life from more than one point of view HERE.

Tips on critiquing books HERE.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

This little light of mine…

McDonnell, Patrick. Shine! New York: Megan Tingley Books/Little, Brown and Company, 2017.
“I wish I were…” Somewhere else. Someone else. Something else. Little Hoshi wishes and wishes she were not a humble little sea star in the ocean. Until she learns, of course, that happiness is to be found right where we are and possibilities always surround us. This delightful picture book – illustrated by Naoko Stoop – is another heart-warming and inspiring story by the creator of the Mutts comic strips. Highly recommended as a read-aloud – for listeners 4 years old and up – and for anyone who needs a humorous reminder that we all can shine.

More stories about individuality HERE.

More books about philosophy HERE.

More picture books HERE.

“Be happy for this moment. This moment is your life.”

– Omar Khayyam, Persian mathematician & poet

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Who is Guru Nanak?

Grace, Jones. The Birthday of Guru Nanak. Kings Lynn, England: BookLife, 2017.

What a lovely book to read aloud and discuss with a group of children! Each page is almost 25 by 30 centimetres in size and illustrated with colour photographs. What is a festival? What is Sikhism? What is the story of Guru Nanak? And how is his birthday celebrated? All these questions are simply and clearly answered for anyone interested in a very basic introduction to the Sikh faith. Highly recommended. 

Guru Nanak “taught that everyone was equal, no matter whether they are rich or poor, a man or a woman, or if they followed a different religion. This is still one of the main beliefs of Sikhism” (11).

An overview of major world religions HERE.

Stories about faith HERE.

Stories set in India HERE.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Whom can you trust?

Lisle, Janet Taylor. Quicksand Pond. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2017.
Twelve-year-old Jessie makes a new friend and discovers a decades-old mystery when she spends the summer with her family in a ramshackle Rhode Island saltbox. This 240-page novel by a skillful novelist is recommended for readers – 11 to 15 years old – who enjoy stories of friendship, secrets, and betrayal. 

More stories of mystery and suspense HERE.

More stories of summer vacations HERE.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email