Do maps tell the truth?

Elliot, David. Henry’s Map. New York: Philomel Books, 2013.
Henry is organized. Everything has its own place. And should stay in its place. But then he makes a map and confusion reigns over the farm yard. This cheerful story will have readers – and listeners – laughing as Henry discovers maps don’t always match what his eyes see. Recommended for ages 4 to 10.

More stories about country life HERE

 

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How did everything begin?

Schutten, Jan Paul. The Mystery of Life: How Nothing Became Everything. New York : Aladdin; Hillsboro, Oregon: Beyond Word, 2015.

How did the universe begin? How old is the earth? Where did the first creature come from? Why do all creatures start out alike? Can the cells in your body talk to one another? Can you see evolution for yourself? Is there life on other planets? Do scientists conceal the facts? These – and many other – questions are all answered in this 230-page book highly recommended for readers 11 years old and up.

Read this book slowly. A few pages per day. So much fascinating information explained in such a simple, easy-to-understand way that you will want to own this book and not just borrow it from a library.

If you really want to learn a lot, draw coloured illustrations to help you remember all the facts you will discover. Put your illustrations into a little booklet that you can read again later.

(On the last page, the author asks, ‘What should you do with this information?’ Decide for yourself, he answers. Talk to religious people, to religious scientists and atheist scientists. Do some research and decide for yourself.)

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Living Through War

McMullan, James. Leaving China: An Artist Paints His World War II Childhood. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin, 2014.

Do you ever feel like you’re not quite good enough? That you can’t ever please your parents? That you don’t belong anywhere? Read this memoir about an artist who grew up moving from country to country – from China to Canada to India and finally to the U.S.A. – and who is now a highly acclaimed designer and illustrator. This 113-page autobiography with full-page illustrations is recommended for readers 10 years old and up.

More picture book memoirs HERE

More stories about moving HERE  

More stories about World War II HERE

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I want to read!

Bryant, Jen. Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2016.
Energetic, impetuous, determined, brilliant. This picture book biography – illustrated by Boris Kulikov – of the young boy who grew up to invent a way for blind people to read is highly recommended for readers of all ages. An author’s note, additional information about Louis Braille, and a bibliography and list of websites are provided at the end of the story.

More biographies HERE

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Explore!

Perkins, Lynne Rae. Frank and Lucky Get Schooled. New York: Greenwillow Books, 2016.
Frank and Lucky – a boy and a dog – have fun learning together. Botany. Entomology. Chemistry. Astronomy. Taxonomy. Reading. Math. History. Art. Geography. Foreign Languages. And Hospitality. Together, they discover that they are learning inside, outside, everywhere they go. A joyous story for all ages to enjoy together.

More dog stories HERE

How I Learned Geography

Shulevitz, Uri. How I Learned Geography. New York: Farrar Straus Giroux, 2008. 
A young boy uses his imagination to travel the world in this picture book recommended for readers 8 to 14 years old. An afterword that provides historical details about the acclaimed author’s life including his childhood as a refugee.

More picture book memoirs HERE

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On the Road Again

Ernst, Lisa Campbell. This Is the Van That Dad Cleaned.New York: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 2005.
In the pattern of ‘This is the House That Jack Built’, this rollicking picture book tells the story of three children who make a mess of the vehicle their father has just cleaned. Full-page pastel, ink, and pencil illustrations will appeal to readers – and listeners – three years old and up. Highly recommended for kindergarten and grade 1 classrooms, but older students will have fun reading it, too. [Automobiles, Cleanliness, Family life; Stories in rhyme]

More stories in rhyme and cumulative tales HERE

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Moving House

Stead, Philip C. Lenny & Lucy. New York: Roaring Brook Press, 2015.
Peter and his dog Harold move to a new home. How can they feel safe in a new house? How can they find friends in their new neighbourhood? Another wonderful collaboration between Philip and Erin Stead, author and illustrator of A Sick Day for Amos McGee. Highly recommended for imaginative readers of all ages.

More stories about moving HERE.

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